Africa research news

Gray seals may be becoming the great white sharks of Dutch beaches - Science AAAS

19 hours 45 min ago

Science AAAS

Gray seals may be becoming the great white sharks of Dutch beaches
Science AAAS
“We thought, 'Of course, how silly,' ” says biologist Mardik Leopold of the Wageningen University and Research Centre in the Netherlands. “You think seals are nice, cuddly animals—they are not. They are predators.” With a towering height of 2.5 meters ...

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Better wildlife monitoring could prevent human disease outbreaks - Science Now

Tue, 2014-11-25 22:23

Better wildlife monitoring could prevent human disease outbreaks
Science Now
In the new study, a team lead by Isabelle-Anne Bisson, a conservation biologist with the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute in Washington D.C., set out to assess whether information on wildlife health could be used to predict the emergence of ...

How Vultures Survive Eating Rotting, Feces-Laden Meat - Newsweek

Tue, 2014-11-25 18:36

Newsweek

How Vultures Survive Eating Rotting, Feces-Laden Meat
Newsweek
The fetid flesh upon which vultures feast contains bacteria and toxins that would kill most large animals, including humans, says Gary Graves, an ornithologist at the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of Natural History. ... In this case ...

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Dolphins use specific whistles as names - EarthSky

Tue, 2014-11-25 17:19

EarthSky

Dolphins use specific whistles as names
EarthSky
The vast majority of research into how bottlenose dolphins communicate has been conducted in captivity or on animals who are restrained during the study. These have ... But, research in Africa, especially on the larger truncatus form, is much more sparse.

An Electric Fence Wards Off Sharks - Smithsonian

Tue, 2014-11-25 16:47

An Electric Fence Wards Off Sharks
Smithsonian
That's why the KwaZulu-Natal Sharks Board in South Africa has announced a plan to keep predators away from beaches. In an experiment lasting through May, researchers are stretching nearly 330 feet of electric cable on the sea floor and monitoring its ...

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Nebraska gardener plants seeds of fresh food in Africa - Lincoln Journal Star

Mon, 2014-11-24 12:03

Lincoln Journal Star

Nebraska gardener plants seeds of fresh food in Africa
Lincoln Journal Star
The Bulungula Incubator has been trying to improve lives in a handful of remote villages of South Africa since 2007. The group works with locals to build schools, provide health care, create jobs and coax crucial infrastructure, like clean water, to a ...

'Star-Gazing' Shrimp Discovered in South Africa - NBCNews.com

Fri, 2014-11-21 15:40

TODAYonline

'Star-Gazing' Shrimp Discovered in South Africa
NBCNews.com
A tiny shrimp equipped with large, candy-striped eyes to ward off predators has been discovered in South African waters, the University of Cape Town said on Friday. The 10-15 mm-long crustacean has been christened the "star-gazer mysid" as its eyes ...
“Star-gazing” shrimp discovered in South AfricaTODAYonline
New shrimp species discovered in SABDlive
New "stargazer shrimp" discovered in the waters off of South AfricaBeta Wired
TheSouthAfrican
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Early sign of yellow fever could lead to new treatment - BBC News

Fri, 2014-11-21 10:06

BBC News

Early sign of yellow fever could lead to new treatment
BBC News
Writing in the journal PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases, US scientists looked at the virus in macaques, in the first study in primates for more than 20 years. They found out how the virus ... William Augusto at the WHO said: "This research work is at ...
Breakthrough in Managing Yellow Fever DiseaseHealthCanal.com

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Africa: Breakthrough in Managing Yellow Fever Disease - AllAfrica.com

Fri, 2014-11-21 09:44

Africa: Breakthrough in Managing Yellow Fever Disease
AllAfrica.com
Found in South America and sub-Saharan Africa, each year the disease results in 200,000 new cases and kills 30,000 people. About 900 million people are at risk of contracting the disease. Now a research team led by a biomedical scientist at the ...

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Breakthrough in managing yellow fever disease - EurekAlert (press release)

Thu, 2014-11-20 19:05

UCR Today

Breakthrough in managing yellow fever disease
EurekAlert (press release)
Found in South America and sub-Saharan Africa, each year the disease results in 200,000 new cases and kills 30,000 people. About 900 million people are at risk of contracting the disease. Now a research team led by a biomedical scientist at the ...
Early sign of yellow fever could lead to new treatmentBBC News

all 10 news articles »

Confessions of an Ivory Consumer - The Atlantic

Thu, 2014-11-20 17:18

The Atlantic

Confessions of an Ivory Consumer
The Atlantic
Ivory received renewed attention this month following reports that the delegation of Chinese President Xi Jinping bought up so much of the material during a March 2013 state visit to Tanzania that, for a time, ivory prices doubled on East African ...

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Poachers Are Now Slaughtering Africa's Giraffes - TakePart

Thu, 2014-11-20 17:15

TakePart

Poachers Are Now Slaughtering Africa's Giraffes
TakePart
Tanzania, which is also the site of massive levels of elephant poaching, typifies another reason for giraffe poaching: The animals are killed to feed the people who are hunting elephants. This also happens in the Congo, Fennessy said, where the Lord's ...

Timeline on Iran's Nuclear Program - New York Times

Thu, 2014-11-20 16:33

New York Times

Timeline on Iran's Nuclear Program
New York Times
... in Tehran and power plants. Iran Signs Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty With the American-provided research reactor running, starting in 1967, Iran becomes one of 51 nations to sign the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty, agreeing to never become a ...

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The Tricky Ethics of Intergalactic Colonization - Wired

Thu, 2014-11-20 11:37

Wired

The Tricky Ethics of Intergalactic Colonization
Wired
Alas, traveling to Africa to buy its iron, no matter how high the quality, would be like driving a hundred miles to pick up a gallon of exceptionally good milk—not a sensible use of time, money, or effort. In 1433, the voyages abruptly ceased; Ming ...

Promoting African Medicinal Plants Through Multi-Stakeholder Meeting-Herbfest - The Guardian

Thu, 2014-11-20 08:13

Promoting African Medicinal Plants Through Multi-Stakeholder Meeting-Herbfest
The Guardian
IF you are reading this, then you either know or have parents who know what we are all missing in refusing to use our available locally grown (behind the house little garden) plants. .... and Technology, the Federal Institute of Industrial Research ...

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Sorting Fact From Fiction and What the Best Science Writing Can Teach Us - TIME

Wed, 2014-11-19 17:00

TIME

Sorting Fact From Fiction and What the Best Science Writing Can Teach Us
TIME
Barbara J. King is a biological anthropologist at the College of William and Mary. ... Sometimes, though, vivid writing and scientific material happily collide in a single volume, as it has done in The Best American Science and Nature Writing 2014 ...

Scientists: Save More Than Forests - Voice of America

Wed, 2014-11-19 16:49

Voice of America

Scientists: Save More Than Forests
Voice of America
Protecting the world's forests is promoted as a way of reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Forests store a lot of carbon in both trees and soil, which helps mitigate climate change. But some researchers say conserving forests alone will not ...

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Bottlenose dolphins use specific whistles as names - Phys.Org

Wed, 2014-11-19 13:38

Bottlenose dolphins use specific whistles as names
Phys.Org
A new study, published in Plos One has found that both species of bottlenose dolphin found in south Africa and Namibia; the Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops aduncus) and the common bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus), use a communication ...

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Fantastically Wrong: Unicorns Dig Virgin Women, and Other Lessons From ... - Wired

Wed, 2014-11-19 13:27

Fantastically Wrong: Unicorns Dig Virgin Women, and Other Lessons From ...
Wired
He or she dug deep into the animal lore of the ancients, combining thoughts of Aristotle, who was arguably the first true scientist (if you haven't yet picked up Armand Marie Leroi's fantastic new book The Lagoon: How Aristotle Invented Science, do so ...

Using Plant Recruitment And Mortality To Support Rangeland Management - Africa Science News Service

Wed, 2014-11-19 04:09

Using Plant Recruitment And Mortality To Support Rangeland Management
Africa Science News Service
Scientists have been collecting data on the different rangeland plant species since the early 1900s; these data are now being synthesized to build a predictive model of plant mortality and regeneration. The article “Incorporating Plant Mortality and ...