Africa research news

Spread of human disease from animals mapped - BBC News

Mon, 2016-06-13 11:45

BBC News

Spread of human disease from animals mapped
BBC News
Scientists say they have developed a better way to predict how animal diseases can spill over into humans. Their model for Lassa fever, which is spread by rats, predicts that there will be twice as many human cases of the disease in Africa by 2070.
Predicting disease outbreaks using environmental changesScience Daily

all 38 news articles »

Spread of human disease from animals mapped - BBC News

Mon, 2016-06-13 11:21

BBC News

Spread of human disease from animals mapped
BBC News
Scientists say they have developed a better way to predict how animal diseases can spill over into humans. Their model for Lassa fever, which is spread by rats, predicts that there will be twice as many human cases of the disease in Africa by 2070.
Zika, Ebola Outbreaks Can Be Predicted Using Climate Change, Scientists SayNature World News
Predicting disease spread from animals improves with new modelMedical News Today
British Scientists Create A New Model To Predict DiseasesNews Every day
Fox News -Science Magazine -Livemint
all 38 news articles »

3-D printed weather stations fill gaps in developing world - whnt.com

Sun, 2016-06-12 23:16

whnt.com

3-D printed weather stations fill gaps in developing world
whnt.com
BOULDER — Scientists have successfully installed the first wave of low-cost weather stations that are designed to provide critically needed information to farmers and other residents in developing countries. ... They were created by weather experts at ...

Scientists use climate, population changes to predict diseases - Reuters

Sun, 2016-06-12 23:02

Reuters

Scientists use climate, population changes to predict diseases
Reuters
LONDON British scientists say they have developed a model that can predict outbreaks of zoonotic diseases – those such as Ebola and Zika that jump from animals to humans – based on changes in climate. Describing their model as "a major improvement in ...
Predicting disease outbreaks using environmental changesEurekAlert (press release)

all 4 news articles »

Big Game Hunting Tourists Trumpet Their Contributions to African Economies - Skift

Sun, 2016-06-12 20:04

Skift

Big Game Hunting Tourists Trumpet Their Contributions to African Economies
Skift
The conservation arm of Safari Club International, which suspended the membership of U.S. dentist Walter Palmer for shooting Cecil, has published research that says trophy hunting contributes $426 million dollars to eight, mostly poor sub-Saharan ...

Monsters in the Med: Huge great whites found in 'safe seas' of European holiday hotspots - Express.co.uk

Sun, 2016-06-12 17:53

Express.co.uk

Monsters in the Med: Huge great whites found in 'safe seas' of European holiday hotspots
Express.co.uk
But talk of sightings of the fearsome Great White Shark within the sea that separates northern Africa from Europe are no longer a myth. The thousands of migrants who have crossed from Libya to Greece and Italy, not only risk drowning, but being eaten ...

and more »

Rangers Use Artificial Intelligence to Fight Poachers - National Geographic

Sun, 2016-06-12 11:02

National Geographic

Rangers Use Artificial Intelligence to Fight Poachers
National Geographic
Poachers kill an estimated 96 African elephants every day, causing conservationists to warn that the iconic animals could disappear in our lifetime if the tide doesn't turn. But now scientists hope a new artificial intelligence (AI) tool could help ...

Leashed walks with lions? African program turns to commercial enterprise to support conservation - The Missoulian

Sun, 2016-06-12 01:12

The Missoulian

Leashed walks with lions? African program turns to commercial enterprise to support conservation
The Missoulian
Sekelou, a second-generation male lion in the reintroduction program called ALERT, African Lion and Environmental Research Trust, based inside the Mosi-oa-Tunya National Park in Zambia, paws toward John Munedaneya, lion handler at the facility. The ...

Tiny bug causes big problem for Africa's tomato farmers - Arkansas Online

Sat, 2016-06-11 07:08

Tiny bug causes big problem for Africa's tomato farmers
Arkansas Online
Yusuf Ibrahim, a tomato farmer in Kano, Nigeria, has lost almost 90 percent of his crop this year to a moth called Tuta absoluta and now he can't afford to plant the corn and rice he normally does after harvesting tomatoes. Since arriving from South ...

and more »

A career in bloom: the Chinese professor who discovered a new plant on Mount Kenya - South China Morning Post

Sat, 2016-06-11 03:05

South China Morning Post

A career in bloom: the Chinese professor who discovered a new plant on Mount Kenya
South China Morning Post
Professor Wang Qingfeng, from the Wuhan Botanical Gardens, discovered a new plant species during a recent expedition by Chinese scientists to the highest mountain in Kenya. Wang, who headed the expedition as director of the Sino-Africa Joint Research ...

Science briefs: Bionic leaf harnesses bacteria to make fuel - Minneapolis Star Tribune

Sat, 2016-06-11 00:01

Science briefs: Bionic leaf harnesses bacteria to make fuel
Minneapolis Star Tribune
A team of scientists at Harvard University says it has come up with a bionic leaf — a system that could use solar power and hydrogen-eating bacteria to generate liquid fuel. The findings, described in the journal Science, offer an alternative path to ...

and more »

Ebola Virus Can Live in More Animals Than Once Thought - Voice of America

Fri, 2016-06-10 19:33

Voice of America

Ebola Virus Can Live in More Animals Than Once Thought
Voice of America
Ebola virus hotspots are more widespread across Africa and are carried by a greater number of animal species than previously suspected, according to a recent study published in the science journal Mammal Review. The study was led by scientists from the ...

and more »

The Milky Way Is Disappearing - The Atlantic

Fri, 2016-06-10 18:01

The Atlantic

The Milky Way Is Disappearing
The Atlantic
Falchi and Chris Elvidge, a scientist at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, have been studying satellite images of the Earth at night since the 1990s. Their first atlas, produced in 2001, used older satellite data that was taken ...
A Third of Humans Can't See the Milky Way Because of Light PollutionInverse
In Lighting Up Our World, We Are Losing Sight of OthersThe Wire

all 82 news articles »

Climate change could trigger tropical evacuations, researchers advise - Phys.Org

Fri, 2016-06-10 10:04

Phys.Org

Climate change could trigger tropical evacuations, researchers advise
Phys.Org
Global warming by just 2 degrees Celsius is likely to force some tropical plant, animal and human populations to relocate hundreds of miles from their current homes this century, according to research published today in the journal Scientific Reports ...

Hunters' Answer to Cecil The Lion Outrage Is That We Create 53000 Jobs - Bloomberg

Fri, 2016-06-10 06:44

Bloomberg

Hunters' Answer to Cecil The Lion Outrage Is That We Create 53000 Jobs
Bloomberg
The conservation arm of Safari Club International, which suspended the membership of U.S. dentist Walter Palmer for shooting Cecil, has published research that says trophy hunting contributes $426 million dollars to eight, mostly poor sub-Saharan ...

Facts About Hyenas - Live Science

Fri, 2016-06-10 04:13

Live Science

Facts About Hyenas
Live Science
Where hyenas live depends on their type. Brown hyenas have a very limited range and live only in Southern Africa, including the Kalahari and Namib deserts. They are usually found between the Angola-Namibia border and the Orange River in South Africa.

Scientists Find Genes That Let These Bees Reproduce Without Males - New York Times

Thu, 2016-06-09 18:40

New York Times

Scientists Find Genes That Let These Bees Reproduce Without Males
New York Times
In this isolated subspecies of honey bees from South Africa, female worker bees can escape their queen's control, take over other colonies and reproduce asexually — with no need for males. Scientists identified the genes most likely to have instigated ...
How honeybees do without malesPhys.Org
Parasitic bees reproduce without males – thanks to genetic quirksCosmos
Honey bees in South Africa have evolved to reproduce without a maleDaily Mail

all 8 news articles »

"Gene drive." Learn the term. Because it could one day transform the world. - Vox

Thu, 2016-06-09 18:20

Vox

"Gene drive." Learn the term. Because it could one day transform the world.
Vox
I'll explain the mechanics below, but the basic idea is that scientists would alter the DNA of a few individual organisms and use gene drives to spread the modification throughout an entire population — by tweaking the rules of genetic inheritance ...

New support for human evolution in grasslands - Science Daily

Thu, 2016-06-09 11:06

Science Daily

New support for human evolution in grasslands
Science Daily
... of grasses by a few million years ago. "The entire evolution of our lineage has involved us living and working in or near grasslands," said lead author Kevin Uno, a postdoctoral research scientist at Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Earth ...

and more »

Africa's Big Tomato Pickle: Miner Grubs Are Wiping Them Out - Bloomberg

Thu, 2016-06-09 10:30

Bloomberg

Africa's Big Tomato Pickle: Miner Grubs Are Wiping Them Out
Bloomberg
While the pest is yet to be detected in South Africa, the risk rises as it spreads, Jan Hendrik Venter, a plant health early-warnings scientist at the nation's Agriculture Ministry, said by e-mail. “Tuta has ... Growers usually increase the amount and ...

and more »